Gloria Jane Turner

Gloria Jane Turner

On the evening of Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, Gloria Jane Turner departed this earthly life. 

She was born in Point Marion, Penn., on March 18, 1931 to the late Walter and Nanny Metheny. They named her Gloria Jean and so she was known until she was grown. When she obtained a copy of her birth certificate she learned that her legal name was Gloria Jane. After she left Pennsylvania she was known as Jane. Her “home folks” still call her Gloria Jean.

After graduating from high school, Jane joined the Women’s Army Corps, and served at Fort Lee, Virginia and Fort Meade, Maryland during the Korean Conflict. She was very proud to have served and counted her time in the WACS as one of the best times of her life.

During her time in the service Jane met and married Douglas Turner, and after they were discharged from the service, they moved to his home state of Kentucky. There they raised their daughter and were together until Doug’s passing in 1985.

In 2004 Jane embarked on a new adventure when she moved to Cody with her daughter and son-in-law. She loved the views of the mountains, and while she missed the green of the Bluegrass State, she came to consider Cody home.

Jane is survived by her daughter and son-in-law Linda and Tim Davis of Clark; her sister Nancy (Tom) Farrier of Masontown, Penn.; numerous nieces and nephews, and her loving church family of the Cody Church of Christ. In addition to her husband and parents, she was predeceased by five sisters and a brother.

There are no services planned at this time.

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